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Til Next Time,

Michael

Seagrove Test

A topic I’m clearly passionate about: maximizing vacation. I’ve already shared my opinions and what I feel are important considerations on the subject (i.e. should you take all your vacation at once and blow it out or try to do more frequent/smaller excursions to get the best value), and I have been surprised to hear that more and more people actually agree.

Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal ran a lifestyle article on The Smartest Way to Take a Vacation. I think it is an extremely well-done piece. It blends science and psychology to put some real thought behind the best way to optimize your time off. Take a look and see for yourself!

Til Next Time,

Michael

Unknown

Breaking news (well, yesterday actually)! Accenture, one of the world’s foremost professional services firms, is getting rid of the annual performance review. I applaud this move and think it is truly a forward-thinking, momentous¬†event for Corporate America. Congrats to them and I wish them well. Such a move will surely have its growing pains (How do you ladder? How do compensation reviews/raises work?), but I believe it will save tons of operational and system administration time. Wait and see, I suppose? Or pull the parachute and get over to Accenture if you’re in that industry ASAP?

Til Next Time,

Michael

While I was not a Psychology major, and didn’t really even take too many behavioral science courses, it has recently become an interest of mine. Social experimentation through well-published authors like Malcolm Gladwell or Dan Ariely is something I find fascinating.

Which is why, when I stumbled onto this post about a Maryland Professor’s social experiment for extra credit on a final exam, I figured I had to share. I am not surprised in the least that only one class has ever gotten the credit. And that he surmises that class is likely an outlier. Unfortunately, I think a lot of people in Corporate America operate under similar principles… “What’s best for me” is (generally) always chosen over “what’s best for the group”, when all things are equal AND you’re allowed to be anonymous. And I don’t know that this is a bad thing. For me, it is kind of one of those “it is what it is” things. We are only human, and only so far removed from animals. It’s sort of just how we’ve all been programmed from tens of thousands¬†of years of social existence. Perhaps we should just embrace it and figure out other ways to delight and engage the masses!

Til Next Time,

Michael

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Til Next Time,

Michael

images

I have discussed work life balance previously, and do think that the concept or the idea (or in some cases – the facade that it seems to be for many) is a great conversation starter. I am of the opinion that work life balance is entirely up to the employee – and they are really the only ones with ultimate control over how their work and personal lives intertwine (if at all). I don’t accept excuses like “well this is the only job I can get and I just have to work 100 hours a week or else”. There’s more than one way to respond when you think someone has a loaded gun pointed at your head (Harvey Spector/Suits reference, anyone?).

Which is why I found this article on Work Life Balance for Millennials on Linked In fairly intriguing. Admittedly, I think the title is extremely deceiving and the main point is that there is a new generation of workers that much more make work revolve around personal rather than vice versa (which is how it persisted for many generations prior). Either way, though, it’s a good read and provides some surface-level insight into the work life balance in the millennial generation dilemma.

Til Next Time,

Michael


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